How to Create the X Stitch

Hello all!

How has everyone been? I took a few weeks away but I have returned to bring you more crochet goodness. While I was away I finished the semester. I did well and I am on track to graduate in December! A friend came down from Seattle to visit. A friend got engaged. It has been an exciting two weeks.

Before I left I was working us through common crochet stitches. There are just a few more of these stitches to get through and then we will start working on projects using these stitches. Today I will show you how to make an X Stitch. In my last post we reviewed the Crossed Stitch. To some the Crossed Stitch may look like an X, I think that the Crossed Stitch kind of looks like when you cross your fingers, but the stitch I am going to show you today much more clearly resembles an X.

You can start an X Stitch into the starting chains, but I like to work a row of double crochet stitches as my first row.

The X Stitch I am working here is the height of a Triple Crochet, and I am working this X Stitch with a 2-Chain Space, this will help you decide how many Chains you need to create in your Starting Chain. My X’s are four stitches wide, plus the Chains to count as the first Triple Crochet and the Triple Crochet Stitch at the end of the row. The X Stitch is very flexible, you can make the X Stitch the height of a Double Crochet, you can create the Stitch with a 3 or more Chain Space, but the version that I will show you today is the most common version of the X Stitch.

After creating the row of Double Crochet stitches, I chained up 5. The chains will count as the first Triple Crochet stitch of the row.

Because this X Stitch is the height of a Triple Crochet stitch, to begin this X we are going to Yarn-Over the hook twice.

Then we are going to insert our hook into the second Double Crochet of the row below. Remember the chains count as a Triple Crochet.

After inserting the hook into the stitch, Yarn-Over and Pull-Up. You will have four loops on your hook at this point. You will now need to Yarn-Over and Pull-Through the first two loops.

This will leave you will three loops on your hook. You will not work through these loops now. At this stage we are going move onto the second leg of the X.

As I mentioned, I am making this X with a 2-Chain Space. This means that I am going to skip two stitches (or chains if you did not create a Double Crochet row) and begin my second leg in the third stitch from my first leg.

Begin this leg like a Double Crochet stitch. Yarn-Over, insert your hook into the designated stitch, Yarn-Over, Pull-Through.

To finish off this part of the X you will Yarn-Over and Pull-Through two loops.

Yarn-Over and Pull-Through the next two loops.

Continue to Yarn-Over and Pull-Through two loops until you have one loop remaining on your hook.

Now you will need to chain stitches. You need to chain the same number of stitches that you skipped. I skipped two stitches so I will need to chain two stitches.

This is the final stage of the X, the upper left arm. We have made the bottom of the X and the upper right arm, if you are following this, then you can see that we need to create the last arm from the middle of the X. At the top of the two legs, find the two loops, Yarn-Over and then insert your hook under those two loops. Work this stitch as a Double Crochet stitch.

Ta-da, you have made an X Stitch!

You can begin working your next X in the same stitch that you just finished this X or you can begin the X in the next stitch (this is my preferred method and the one shown in the picture below). If you want to put more space between your X’s you will need to chain, the same number of stitches you intend to skip.


Have you used an X stitch in your projects? Do you have a stitch you would like for me to show you? Let’s Talk!

Crossed Stitch

This is one of my favorite stitches that I learned this last year. I know that as a basic crochet stitch I probably should have learned this earlier, but better late than never. The Crossed Stitch, not to be confused with cross-stitch, is created by crocheting a Double Crochet or Triple Crochet stitch, then crocheting behind that stitch, back into skipped stitches/chains. It is a bit complicated, but once you get it you will never understand why you thought it was so complicated in the first place.

I am going to show you Triple Crochet Crossed Stitches. You can start a Crossed Stitch with chains, but I like to anchor my Crossed Stitches (and most of my ‘looser’ stitches) with foundation stitches (DC/TC) at the beginning and ending of the rows. This means that I like two stitches at the beginning and ending of the rows and not the one created by the chains.

Chain a multiple of 3 plus 7.

The Crossed Stitches take up three chains (the multiple) You will need four chains for your starting Triple Crochet, and the remaining three chains are for the anchor Triple Crochet Stitches. If you intend on only crocheting one anchor at the beginning and the ending of the row you will chain a multiple of 3 plus 5.

With my chain of 31 (24 + 7), I created my first Triple Crochet in the fifth chain from the hook.

To begin the Crossed Stitch, skip two chains.

Create a Triple Crochet in the third chain.

If you like the look of one stitch at the beginning and ending of the rows, begin your Crossed Stitch in the sixth chain from the hook and continue working the stitch from here forward.

 

After completing the Triple Crochet, Chain one.

You will now create a Triple Crochet behind the first Triple Crochet. Skip one chain, i.e. crochet back, into the first of the two skipped chains.

You should now have your second Triple Crochet, a skipped chain, and your first Triple Crochet, in that order from right to left.

To create another Crossed Stitch, skip two chains, create a Triple Crochet in the third chain.

The second Triple Crochet of your second Crossed Stitch should end up in the chain next to the first Triple Crochet of your first Crossed Stitch.

 

Some patterns may request that you end and begin the Crossed Stitches in the same chains. This is not consistent with that I have reviewed here. Read the pattern carefully. Make sure you count your stitches carefully.

 

Ta-da, the Crossed Stitch.

I love this stitch! What do you think? What is your favorite stitch? Let’s Talk!

Cluster Stitch

Marching forward on our learn the basic crochet stitches road, today I have for you the Cluster Stitch. The Cluster Stitch is like the Puff Stitch. Where as the Puff Stitch is worked in one stitch, the Cluster Stitch is worked across four stitches. Working across multiple stitches will create a puckered look in this stitch, instead of the popped look of the Puff Stitch.

We are going to start this stitch the same way that we did the Puff Stitch, with an incomplete Double Crochet. YO, pull-up, YO, pull-through, leaving two loops on your hook.

 

Now this is where the Cluster differs from the Puff. We are going to create an incomplete Double Crochet in the next stitch, not the same stitch.

 

 

YO, pull-up, YO, pull through the first two loops.

 

 

You should have three loops on your hook.

 

 

Now, you are going to move to the next stitch, and create an incomplete Double Crochet in that stitch too.

 

 

YO, pull-up, YO, pull through the first two loops.

 

 

You should now have four loops on your hook.

 

 

Now, you are going to move to the next stitch, and create an incomplete Double Crochet in that stitch too. This will be our final incomplete Double Crochet.

 

 

YO, pull-up, YO, pull through the first two loops.

 

 

You should now have five loops on your hook. You are now going to YO and pull through all five loops on your hook.

 

 

Ta-da, the Cluster Stitch.

The Cluster Stitch is the first stitch that we have reviewed that decreased your stitch count. By this I mean that we created four stitches across four stitches, but then pulled through to make them only “one” stitch. When you are using this in a project ensure that you watch the stitch counts in your rows.

Do you use a Cluster Stitch when you crochet? Do you have another decreasing stitch you prefer? Let’s Talk!

Puff Stitch

As we continue to learn basic crochet stitches today we will review how to make a Puff Stitch. A Puff Stitch is similar to the Popcorn Stitch and the Bobble Stitch, if you combine them. That is, you make the Puff Stitch in the same stitch, like we did with the Bobble Stitch, but we are creating individual stitches and then “connect” them, like we did with the Popcorn Stitch.

We are going to create Double Crochet Puff Stitches today, but you can create Puff Stitches using Double Crochet or Triple Crochet. We are going to start by creating the first half of a Double Crochet, by kind of making an incomplete Half-Double Crochet.

Puff Stitches can be made at any point in a pattern, just ensure you are not making them at the beginning of the row or the last stitch of the row because the stitches will make your edges look uneven.

Once you have chosen where you are going to create your Puff Stitch. Yarn-over (YO) insert your hook into that stitch and pull-up, YO and pull through. This creates the first half of the Double Crochet or the incomplete Half-Double Crochet that I was talking about earlier.

Now we are going to repeat this again in the same stitch.

YO, pull-up, YO, and pull through. You will now have two incomplete stitches on your hook, and three loops.

Repeat once more. YO, pull-up, YO, pull through. Now there are three incomplete stitches on your hook, four loops. You can stop here and make a smaller Puff Stitch.

YO and pull through all four loops on your hook.

Ta-Da, little Puff Stitch created.

If you want to create a larger Puff Stitch, you can Repeat, YO, pull-up, YO- pull through.
You will now have four incomplete stitches on your hook, five loops on your hook. You can stop here, YO and pull through all five loops.

Or you can make your Puff Stitch even puffier and Repeat once more. YO, pull-up, YO pull through. Now you will have five incomplete stitches on your hook, six loops total. Stop here, YO and pull through all six loops on your hook.

Here you can see what the different size Puff Stitches look like. The Puff Stitch on the left is the smallest puff and the Puff Stitch on the right is our largest. My preference is the third Puff Stitches.

Do you like to crochet with Puff Stitches? Do you have a preferred Puff Stitch size? Have another stitch you would like me to show you? Let’s Talk!

Shell Stitch

The past few weeks we have been reviewing how to make some of the fundamental stitches in crochet. We have focused on many stitches that build onto or use a Double Crochet stitch. Today we will also use Double Crochet stitches, and Single Crochet stitches too, you may want to review the tutorials on how to make those stitches before moving forward here.

Shell Stitch

Materials:

Yarn: Medium (4) Weight Yarn- Here I have used Vanna’s Choice

Hook: The recommended hook size for the yarn- Here I used a Boye- J-10/6.00MM

Yarn Needle/Darning Needle

Scissors

Stitch Markers (Optional)

Stitches & Abbreviations:

CH- Chain

SK- Skip

SC- Single Crochet

DC- Double Crochet

SHL- Shell Stitch

H-SHL- Half-Shell Stitch

REP- Repeat

( )- Total Stitch Count at the End of the Row

Notes:

Make only one Stitch in the Stitch below unless specifically instructed to create more than one Stitch.

There are two Half-Shells on the odd number rows. I will label them H-SHL-1 and H-SHL-2. H-SHL-1 is the half-shell created at the beginning of the row, it is created by 3 Chain stitches and two Double Crochet stitches. H-SHL-2 is at the end of the row and is created by 3 Double Crochet stitches.

CH 23.

Row One:

In the fourth Chain from the hook create two Double Crochet stitches in the same Chain.

The Chain three and the two Double Crochet stitches are going to create our first Half-Shell of Row One.

Count three Chains. Create a Single Crochet in the third Chain.

There should be two empty Chains between the Half-Shell and the Single Crochet.

Count three Chains. In the third Chain you will create your first full Shell. To create the Shell you will crochet 5 Double Crochet stitches in the third Chain.

Count three Chains. Create a Single Crochet in the third Chain.

Count three Chains. Create five Double Crochet stitches (One Shell) in the third Chain.

Count three Chains. Create a Single Crochet in the third Chain.

In the last Chain (not the Slip Knot) create three Double Crochet stitches (Half-Shell) in that Chain.

That is the end of Row One. Chain one. Turn.

Row Two:

The shells in Row Two will be created in the Single Crochets of Row One. Create five Double Crochet stitches (One Shell) in the first Single Crochet of Row One.

As in Row One we will create a Single Crochet between the Shell Stitches. The Single Crochet stitches will be created on the middle (third Double Crochet) of the Shell from Row One.

Create a Shell Stitch (5 Double Crochet stitches) in the next Single Crochet.

Single Crochet into the third Double Crochet of the Shell below.

Create a Shell Stitch (5 Double Crochet stitches) in the next Single Crochet.

At the end of the row, Single Crochet into the top/third chain of the chain three (that we counted as Double Crochet.

Chain Three. Turn.

Row Three:

Count the Chain three as a Double Crochet. Crochet two Double Crochet Stitches into the turning space.

You have created the Half-Shell that is the beginning of the Row.

Single Crochet into the third Double Crochet of the Shell below.

Create a Shell Stitch (5 Double Crochet stitches) in the next Single Crochet.

Single Crochet into the third Double Crochet of the Shell below.

Create a Shell Stitch (5 Double Crochet stitches) in the next Single Crochet.

Single Crochet into the third Double Crochet of the Shell below.

Create three Double Crochet stitches (Half-Shell) in the turning chain at the end of the Row.

Pattern:

Foundation:

Multiples of Nine + Four (or Five if you do not want to use the Slip Knot as stitch)

Row One:

Count CH 3 as first DC. 2 DC in fourth CH from hook. (H-SHL-1 created) SK 2 CH. SC in third CH. SK 2 CH. 5 DC in third CH. (SHL created). SK 2 CH. SC in third CH. SK 2 CH. SHL in third CH. SK 2 CH. SC in third CH. SK 2 CH. H-SHL-2 in final CH. CH One. Turn. (2 H-SHL, 3 SC, 2 SHL)

Row Two:

Count CH as first SC. SK 2 DC. 5 DC/SHL in SC of previous Row. SK 2 DC. SC in third DC of SHL. SK 2 DC, SHL in SC of previous Row. SK 2 DC. SC in third DC of SHL. SK 2 DC, SHL in SC of previous Row. SK 2 DC. SC in the top CH of the CH 3. (3 SHL, 4 SC)

REP Row One and Row Two until the project is as long as you want it to be.

What do you think of the Shell Stitch? Do you have any additional advice on how to create the Shell Stitch? Have any stitches you would like to learn?

Popcorn Stitch

I love when things are named after food, it is so evocative. Popcorn. If you are picturing what I am picturing, you see puffy, light, semi-round, pop, and the Popcorn Stitch is very much like that. When we created the Bobble stitch, it created a dense stitch that is in line with the other stitches, but the Popcorn Stitch creates a stitch pops up above the other stitches. This stitch is made with Double Crochet, check out this post for a refresher on how to create the Double Crochet Stitch.

Materials:

Yarn: Medium (4) Weight Yarn- Here I have used Vanna’s Choice Hook: The recommended hook size for the yarn- Here I used a Boye- J-10/6.00MM Yarn Needle/Darning Needle Scissors Stitch Markers (Optional)

Stitches & Abbreviations:

CH- Chain DC- Double Crochet   SLST- Slip Stitch YO- Yarn Over

Foundation:

Chain an even number of stitches.

Notes:

Make only one Stitch in the Stitch below unless specifically instructed to create more than one Stitch.

Pattern:

R1: Count 2 CH as first DC. DC across the row. Turn. R2: CH 2, count as first DC. Now create the Popcorns. DC in 2nd DC of R1. Create 4 more DC in the same stitch. To create the Popcorn you are going to “fold” this Shell in half. To do this remove your hook from the top of the fifth DC of the Shell and insert the hook into the back-loop of the first DC of the Shell. Feed your hook from the first DC to the fifth DC. Insert your hook into the loop you dropped when you pulled your hook from the top of the last DC. You will now have two loops on your hook. YO and pull through the two loops. Ta-da, you have made a Popcorn Stitch. On your next row, R3, you will need to crochet into the top of the Popcorn Stitch. When we created the Popcorn, we “folded” the Shell. When we did this we pulled a loop through the first and fifth DC, it is this loop that you are going to crochet into. On the back of the Popcorn, find these two loops. YO (we are creating a DC) then insert your hook under the two loops on the back of the Popcorn., make your DC.     Do you enjoy making the Popcorn Stitch? Have stitch you would like to see a tutorial for? Let’s talk!

Bobble Stitch

I think it was about seven years ago that I learned how to make the Bobble Stitch. I had just started reading patterns and using them to make projects. I had chosen patterns where I already knew how to do the stitches. Then I wanted to make my grandmother a blanket and I really liked a blanket with bobble, I loved the look. Bobbles were just so different from the other stitches that I knew how to make, namely because they are round. All the other stitches that I knew how to make created lines, but round stitches, that would up my crochet game. I had been able to read, look at rudimentary drawings and talk with friends, when I learned how to create every stitch, until the Bobble Stitch. The directions said to yarn-over and pull-up and I had no idea what that meant, and my traditional resources could not make it make sense to me. This was the first time I turned to the internet for answers to a crochet problem. I spent a few days looking for a satisfactory answer, and then one day, before a class, remember I love to bring my crochet with me everywhere, I finally found an answer that made the stitch make sense to me. Years later I make this stitch all the time, here is how I make a bobble stitch.   I usually make a Bobble Stitch in conjunction with Half-Double (HDC) or Double Crochet (DC) Stitches. The beanie pictured herein is made with HDC, but I my instructional pictures use DC. Chain an even number of stitches. R1: Count first 2 CH as DC. DC in 3rd CH from hook and DC across. Turn. Now to learn how to make a Bobble Stitch. (R2) You are going to Yarn-Over (YO), this is the same way that you would start a HDC or DC. Insert your hook into the second DC of R1, again just like you would to create a HDC or DC. You are going to YO, again just like you would to create a HDC or DC, but this next step is where things change. When you pull-up your yarn, you need to pull-up until the loops on the hook are the height of your chains. Yarn-over (YO). Now, you are going to insert your hook into the same stitch. YO, and pull-up. Again, pull-up until the loops on your hook are the same height as the chains. You should now have 5 loops on your hook. YO, insert hook into same stitch, YO, pull-up. You should now have 7 loops on your hook. You can see that as I add more loops onto my hook it becomes harder to pull the loops to be level with the chains. If you do not pull-up the loops far enough, you will not be able to complete the stitch. You can stop here and make a smaller bobble, but I like bobbles with more definition. So once more, YO, insert hook into same stitch, YO, and pull-up. Now you will have 9 loops on your hook. You can repeat this process to create an even bigger bobble, you will have 11 loops on your hook, but any more than 11 loops is very difficult to work with. To finish the bobble, YO and pull through all the loops on your hook. Here is what the bobbles look like with chain spaces between. With the spaces it is clear, the bobbles are made in only one stitch and the bobbles are cute little round stitches. Here is what the bobbles look like with stitches between them. Happy Bobble Stitch making folks! Are you a fan of the Bobble Stitch? Have some other advice about how to make Bobble Stitches? Let’s talk!

Ribs in the Round

As we have been discussing front-post and back-post double crochet we have reviewed the creation of rectangular, flat projects, like the Waffle Stitch and the Basket Stitch.. But there are times when you may want to use front-post and back-post stitches for a cowl or for a beanie

When making a cowl you can make the cowl flat and connect/sew the ends of the project when you are done, or you can create the cowl in the round

I chose to create a flat project and connect the ends because I wanted the ribs on my cowl to be vertical and not horizontal. If you want to create horizontal ribs you can create the project flat or in the round.

To create this flat project, I crochets a full row of DC, then FPDC, then a full row of BPDC, switching back and forth between FPDC and BPDC until the project was as long as I wanted it to be.

Crocheting the same stitch all the way across the row, then switching, created a project with two very distinct sides. You can see that the one side has vertical ribs, and the other has horizontal post stitches.

If I had chosen to crochet this cowl in the round, I would not have to switch back and forth between FPDC and BPDC, I would choose one or the other, because in the round you do not turn your project. This will make more sense as I explain how to make a ribbed beanie.

I think that for most people round implies circle, and this is true in crochet but there are different ways to create a circle. One of the ways is to create a chain, slip stitch the end of the chain to the beginning of the chain and crochet a tube, like I suggested could be done for the cowl. You can make a beanie like this, from the bottom to the top. But, I am not going to show you how to make a beanie like that today. Nope, today we are going to learn how to make a beanie from the top to the bottom.

Materials:

Yarn: Medium (4) Weight Yarn- Here I have used Vanna’s Choice

Hook: The recommended hook size for the yarn- Here I used a Boye- J-10/6.00MM

Yarn Needle/Darning Needle

Scissors

Stitch Markers (Optional)

Stitches & Abbreviations:

CH- Chain

DC- Double Crochet

FPDC- Front-post Double Crochet

BPDC- Back-post Double Crochet

SLST- Slip Stitch

REP- Repeat

( )- Total Stitch Count at the End of the Row

Foundation:

Joined Chains. Odd number of DC in R1.

Notes:

Make only one Stitch in the Stitch below unless specifically instructed to create more than one Stitch.

Pattern:

CH 4. Join the last CH to the Slip Knot to create a circle.

For R1 you are going to crochet inside the small circle you just created, do not crochet in the chains of the circle.

R1. 12 DC in the circle. Join with a Slip Stitch.

For R2 we are going to crochet two stiches on to the same stitch.

R2: CH 2 (Count as DC). On the next First DC of R1, you will 2 FPDC. Crochet 2 FPDC around each DC of R1 across the round. You will end with 25 stitches. Join with a Slip Stitch.

R3: CH 2 (Count as DC) FPDC onto the FPDC of R2 and DC between the 2 FPDC of R2.

Repeat around to last FPDC, end on FPDC. (48)

R4: CH 2 (Count as DC). FPDC onto the FPDC of R3. BPDC onto the DC of R3. FPDC, BPDC across round. (48)

REP R4 until project is as long as you want it to be.

This beanie will fit most medium to large heads, the ribs make the sizing very flexible.

If you want to make a smaller beanie crochet fewer DC in R1.

If you want to make a larger beanie crochet more DC in R1.

Basket(weave) Stitch

I want to continue today with front-post and back-post double crochet stitch patterns. As I have explained, to become excellent at any stitch you need to practice and I like to practice by learning variations. We have discussed how to create rib and waffle stitches using front-post and back-post double crochet, today we are going to review the Basket Stitch or Basket Weave Stitch.

The Basket Stitch is great for so many projects, but especially for projects where you want the pattern on both sides of the project.

The Waffle Stitch creates a pattern on one side of the project, this is great for pillow cases, blankets, beanies, but is not as dynamic on a scarf. The Basket Stitch is perfect if you are looking for a more dynamic stitch.

The Basket Stitch is so named because the finished project looks like a woven basket.

With this stitch, front-post and back-post double crochets are grouped, usually in sets of four wide stitches wide by five rows high. By this I am not implying that you create this pattern in squares and connect them, you will work down the row in the traditional fashion.

When you are creating this stitch, more than with the other stitches I have reviewed in the past few weeks, you must be vigilant with your counts, fortunately, the stitch will show you when you have messed up. This is the first stitch where you might want to break out the stitch markers to help you keep count.

Materials:

Yarn: Medium (4) Weight Yarn- Here I have used Vanna’s Choice

Hook: The recommended hook size for the yarn- Here I used a Boye- J-10/6.00MM

Yarn Needle/Darning Needle

Scissors

Stitch Markers (optional)

Stitches & Abbreviations:

CH- Chain

DC- Double Crochet

FPDC- Front-post Double Crochet

BPDC- Back-post Double Crochet

REP- Repeat

( )- Total Stitch Count at the End of the Row

Foundation:

Chain multiples of 4

Notes:

I use 2 Chains to create the first Double Crochet on every row, except for Row One

Make only one Stitch in the Stitch below unless specifically instructed to create more than one Stitch.

Each row will end in a DC.

I do not crochet in the slip knot at the beginning of the chain row.

Pattern:

CH 40. Turn.

R1: Count 3 CH as first DC, DC in 4th CH from hook. DC in next 35. (36 DC) Turn.

R2: Ch 2 (Count as first DC). 3 FPDC.4 BPDC. 4 FPDC. 4 BPDC. 4 FPDC. 3 BPDC. DC in the last stitch.

R3: Ch 2 (Count as first DC). 3 BPDC.4 FPDC. 4 BPDC. 4 FPDC. 4 BPDC. 3 FPDC. DC in the last stitch.

R4: REP R2.

R5: REP R3.

R6: REP R2.

(You have created your first set of “weave”. As you switch from FPDC to BPDC you kept the weave in each group on the same side of the project. Next you will reverse your weave and reverse your steps)

R7: REP R2.

R8: REP R3.

R9: REP R2.

R10: REP R3.

R11: REP R2.

(You have completed your second set of “weave”. You should now have two sets of squares completed that face opposite directions. Now you will repeat.)

REP R2-R11 until your project is as long as you want it to be.

Fasten off. Weave in ends.

I like my Basket Stitch projects to be squares and while this is my favorite variation of the Basket Stitch, you can create 2×2 weaves, 6×6 weaves, 8×8 weaves, or you can create rectangular weaves (keep them in multiples of two or four for the best results).

Do you have a favorite Basket Stitch variation you like to use? Have other front-post and back-post stitch variations that you would like to learn? Let’s talk.

Waffles and Ribs

I grew up in Sparks, Nevada. Although the lines between Reno, Nevada and Sparks, Nevada are hazy and Sparks is often the proverbial step-child to Reno, Sparks is a distinct and vibrant city unto itself. Sparks was founded by the Southern Pacific Railroad (SP) in 1903-04 when the railroad realigned its tracks for a more efficient route, moving their hub from Wadsworth, NV to what is now Sparks, NV. “The town was variously called East Reno, Glendale, and Harriman. The towns folk finally named the new city ‘Sparks’ in honor of then sitting Nevada Governor John Sparks. The Governor threw a barbecue for all at his Alamo Ranch south of Reno.” I learned all of this and more from the Sparks Museum. It is worth the time (and the $5 for adults) to go into the museum. But, if you want to read a quick history of Sparks this article from Nevada Magazine is a quick and informative read.

Sparks has few claims to fame but the best known is the Best In the West Nugget Rib Cook-Off, fitting given how Sparks got its name. The Rib-Cook off began in 1989 and now hosts almost half a million people. I have heard that it is the largest out-door barbecue festival in the world (but I didn’t know if this is true). The Rib-Cook Off was one of my favorite events to attend during my childhood; it signalled the ending of summer, and brought in food from around the country.

With the addition of the Marina, the Outlets at Legends and the Shops at the Galleria/Sparks Crossing, Sparks today looks like a veritable mecca of food, shops and entertainment as compared to the Sparks of my youth. I remember celebrating when the Outback opened. Hallelujah, there was one more restaurant in Sparks. (Notice that it is a barbecue-style restaurant). One of my favorite Sparks restaurants today is the Great Basin Brewing Co. opened in 1993, which makes them Nevada’s oldest operating brewery. I have recently become a Yelper. https://chelseahahn.yelp.com/

But this post is not entirely about food, it is also about crochet. Last week, I explained how to make front-post and back-post double crochet. Today I want to show you some of the fantastic patterns that you can create with front- and back-post double crochet, Rib Stitches (see what I did there) and Waffle Stitches (I know that it is traditionally Chicken and Waffles, but there is no chicken stitch in crochet).

Single-Side Ribs

Double crochet is one of the stitches that I use most often, but there are times when I want add just a bit of texture to my project. I do this most often with what I call Single-Side Ribs. Single-Side Ribs are composed of double crochet, front-post double crochet and back-post double crochet. I tend to space my ribs with two or three double crochets between the front-post and back-post double crochets.

To create Single-Side Ribs, like I show in my example, you need to chain a multiple of three plus two chains. Count two chains (CH) as first double crochet (DC), then double crochet into the third chain from your hook. Double crochet across each chain. If you need a refresher on how to create a double crochet, review this post. When you count your double crochets you should have a multiple of three. You lose the plus to to the creation of the first double crochet (DC). After creating the first row of double crochet stitches, chain two and turn.

Row two will start will a double crochet, then you will create a front-post double crochet (FPDC). If you need to review how to make it, review my post on front-post and back-post double crochets. Then crochet two double crochets, then a front-post double crochet (FPDC) across your pattern for as many multiples of three as you chained. You will end with a double crochet. You will use back-post double (BPDC) crochet in row three.

To make this you will need:

Materials:

Yarn: Medium (4) Weight Yarn- Here I have used Vanna’s Choice
Hook: The recommended hook size for the yarn- Here I used a Boye- J-10/6.00MM
Yarn Needle/Darning Needle
Scissors

Stitches & Abbreviations:

CH- Chain
DC- Double Crochet
FPDC- Front-post Double Crochet
BPDC- Back-post Double Crochet
REP- Repeat
( )- Total Stitch Count at the End of the Row

Foundation:

Chain multiples of 3+ 2

Notes:

I use 2 Chains to create the first Double Crochet on every row.
Every row ends with a Double Crochet.
Make only one Stitch in the Stitch below unless specifically instructed to create more than one Stitch.
I do not crochet in the slip knot at the beginning of the chain row.

Pattern:

CH 17. Turn
R1: Count 2 CH as first DC, DC in 3rd CH from hook. DC in next 14 CH. (15 DC total) Turn.
R2: Ch 2 (Count as first DC). FPDC. 2 DC. FPDC. 2 DC. FPDC. 2 DC. FPDC. 2 DC. FPDC. DC. (15 Total)
R3: Ch 2 (Count as first DC). BPDC. 2 DC. BPDC. 2 DC. BPDC. 2 DC. BPDC. 2 DC. BPDC. DC. (15 Total)
Repeat (REP) R2 and R3 until your work is as long as you want it to be.

Rib(bed) Stitch

One of the easiest front-post double crochet (FPDC) and back-post double crochet (BPDC) patterns to create is the Rib Stitch or Ribbed Stitch.

You can see that I made this scarf in a Rib Stitch. This is a super scarf, it is very wide and very long, but not very heavy. I love when I can make a scarf so large it can substitute as a blanket, but it doesn’t feel like a weight around your neck. To make this scarf I used Red Heart Super Saver Yarn in Icelandic (the variegated yarn) and Dark Grey.

To make this you will need:

Materials:

Yarn: Medium (4) Weight Yarn- Here I have used Vanna’s Choice
Hook: The recommended hook size for the yarn- Here I used a Boye- J-10/6.00MM
Yarn Needle/Darning Needle
Scissors

Stitches & Abbreviations:

CH- Chain
DC- Double Crochet
FPDC- Front-post Double Crochet
BPDC- Back-post Double Crochet
REP- Repeat
( )- Total Stitch Count at the End of the Row

Foundation:

Chain an even number.

Notes:

I use 2 Chains to create the first Double Crochet on every row.
Every row ends with a Double Crochet.
Make only one Stitch in the Stitch below unless specifically instructed to create more than one Stitch.
I do not crochet in the slip stitch at the beginning of the chain row.

Pattern:

CH 16. Turn.
R1: Count 2 CH as first DC (here and throughout the pattern), DC in 3rd CH from hook. DC in next 13 CH (14 DC). Turn.
R2: CH 2. FPDC. BPDC. (REP 5 more times). DC in last stitch. (14)
R3: CH 2. BPDC. FPDC. (REP 5 more times). DC in last stitch. (14)
REP R2 and R3 for as many rows as you would like.

Waffle Stitch

The Waffle Stitch has a few variations, find one that you like, this is the one that I like.

To make this you will need:

Materials:

Yarn: Medium (4) Weight Yarn- Here I have used Vanna’s Choice
Hook: The recommended hook size for the yarn- Here I used a Boye- J-10/6.00MM
Yarn Needle/Darning Needle
Scissors

Stitches & Abbreviations:

CH- Chain
DC- Double Crochet
FPDC- Front-post Double Crochet
BPDC- Back-post Double Crochet
REP- Repeat
( )- Total Stitch Count at the End of the Row

Foundation:

Chain an even number.

Notes:

I use 2 Chains to create the first Double Crochet on every row.
Every row ends with a Double Crochet.
Make only one Stitch in the Stitch below unless specifically instructed to create more than one Stitch.
I do not crochet in the slip knot at the beginning of the chain row.

Pattern:

CH 18.
R1: Count 2 CH as first DC (here and throughout the pattern), DC in 3rd CH from hook.. DC across. (16 DC)
R2: CH 2. 2 FPDC. DC. (REP 4 more times). (16)
R3: CH 2. 2 DC. FPDC. (REP 3 more times). 3 DC. (16)
REP R2 and R3 as many times as you want.

 

Do you like to eat waffles or ribs? Have you made crochet projects in the waffle or rib stitch? Let’s talk.